Archive | Recipes RSS feed for this section

bodacious beets…
what they did not teach you in school

Beet Salad by Cathy Nelson Arkle

Beets belong in the category of vegetables I hated as a child. Anything that slid out of a can was high on the “yuck factor.” It was only until my girlfriend Nan gave me the “roasted beet challenge.” She said don’t tell me you hate beets until you have eaten a roasted one. Since I always enjoy a good challenge, I bought a single beet as I didn’t want to have too much to throw out. I wrapped it in foil, threw it in the oven for an hour and silently anticipated it’s doomed fate. Well the joke was on me as I devoured that tasty sweet thang with vigor.

Sweet Beets

Nutritionally speaking, the beet is a kindred spirit to the carrot, although it is much higher in sugar. In fact, of all vegetables, the beet has the highest sugar content. Not sure how I missed this opportunity to eat more sugar as a kid… oh yeah… my mother served it out of a can. It is estimated that about two-thirds of commercial beet crops end up canned. So sad.

Beets (everywhere else in the world they are called beetroot) are thought to have originated in prehistoric times in N. Africa. It is said that beetroot remains have been excavated in the Third dynasty Saqqara pyramid at Thebes, Egypt. I must of missed that when I was there.

Sand Storm at the Saqqara Pyramid in Thebes, Egypt

I couldn’t see much because I was too busy making a fashion statement in a blinding sand storm.

And the beet goes on…

Beet leaves have been eaten since before written history. The beet root was generally used medicinally and did not become a popular food until French chefs recognized their potential in the 1800’s. You have to love the French!  I wonder if they were the ones that came up with making beet wine.

Since Roman times, beet juice has been considered an aphrodisiac. Was that before or after it was made into wine?

If you are not getting your beets in wine, you might be able to get it in frozen pizza. Yep, some frozen pizzas use beet powder to color the tomato sauce.

Beets can even help melt snow! One way or another you are going to get your beets if I can help it.

Why? Because beets are loaded with lots of good stuff like antioxidants and nutrients, including magnesium, sodium, potassium and vitamin C.

Some experts say adding beet juice to your diet could provide a performance boost even beyond the blood, sweat and tears of more training. Does this mean I don’t have to go to the gym anymore?

Don’t take my word for it. According to the NY Times Blog, beets are among the 11 best foods you aren’t eating.

Cathy’s Bodacious Beet Salad

If this recipe was a piece of art it would be mixed media. I took a little of this and a little of that from different recipes to make this as I saw it in my mind. The Santa Monica farmers market provided the fresh ingredients for this salad. I used french thyme because that what was growing in my herb garden, but use what you like. The dressing generously Serves 2.

Beet Salad Ingredients 

  • 2 fresh red or yellow beets
  • 4 ounces goat cheese – rolled into balls I used Redwood Hill Farm’s traditional chevre
  • french thyme – a couple sprigs per ball, washed well and dried
  • 2 cups micro greens or any small leaf greens – washed well and dried I used sweet baby lettuce with edible flowers from Harry’s Berries
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, toasted – I used Peacock Family Farm’s locally grown walnuts

Walnut Oil Dressing Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup walnut oil – I used La Nogalera Walnut Oil I could just drink this stuff plain!
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Coarse kosher salt, pepper

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a roasting pan with aluminum foil. Place the beets in the pan, leaving a little of the root tail on. Rub olive oil over the beets, and sprinkle with salt. Cover the beets with another sheet of aluminum foil. Roast for 1 to 2 hours, depending on the size of the beets and how old they are. After 1 hour, test every fifteen minutes by poking a beet with the tines of a fork. Once the fork tines go in easily, the beets are tender and cooked. Remove from the oven.
  2. While beets are roasting, mix the dressing. Whisk the dijon mustard and balsamic vinegar together.  While you are whisking or using a hand blender, slowly add the walnut oil and then olive oil to make an nice emulsification. Add salt & pepper to taste.
  3. After the beets have cooled for several minutes, peel off the outer skins and discard. If you do this under running water you will avoid staining your hands. Cut the bottom of the beet so it will sit up straight. Then cut the beets into quarters, but not all the way through.  Place on a plate and open it up like a flower.
  4. Roll the goat cheese into little balls about 1/2” in diameter and roll in the fresh thyme.
    Place ball in the middle of the beet.
  5. Add your baby lettuce around it and drizzle the walnut oil over the salad.
  6. Add toasted walnuts

Ta-da! Long live the beet season. Thanks Nan for the beet challenge. I wonder what other yucky childhood vegetable will next on my discovery list?
…and then she paused for thought.

Read full story · Comments { 2 }

Wild about Watermelon

watermelon on grill

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CATHY NELSON ARKLE:

“…when one has tasted watermelon he knows what the angels eat…” – Mark Twain

square watermelon

Mark Twain and King Tut have different beliefs on who eats watermelon. Whether it’s angelic or royalty, Homer Simpson is the one who knows how to pick a proper one.

Click here to see the video.

I have read about an Egyptian tradition to put watermelons in the burial tombs of pharaohs as a present for their afterlife. As unusual as this sounds, numerous watermelon seeds were recovered from the tomb of King Tut.  I wonder if that meant King Tut ate the watermelons and spit out the seeds in his afterlife. Strange… I was in Egypt a few years ago and apparently missed the watermelon hieroglyphics. I went on a google pics quest to no avail, so I thought I would “imagine” what it would look like.

egyptian watermelon hieroglyphics

PHOTO ENHANCEMENT BY CATHY NELSON ARKLE

The current thought is that watermelon originated in Southern Africa, where it is still found growing wild, in the Kalahari desert.  What I love about watermelon is every part of the watermelon is edible, even the seeds and rinds. Now that is what I call “wholestic” eating!  Watermelon doesn’t contain any fat or cholesterol and is an excellent source of vitamins A, B6 & C, and contains fiber, potassium and lycopene. It doesn’t get much better than that! Continue Reading →

Read full story · Comments { 1 }

in praise of perfect popovers…

BLT Steak, LA - Popovers

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: CATHY NELSON ARKLE

I am a cooking class junkie.  There… I said it. Whew.  Cooking is my newest obsession.  I have traded in my paints, brushes and canvases for food, utensils, and pans.  Instead of mixing watercolors, I mix herbs, oils and strange vegetables that I hated as a child.  I find the smells coming from my oven to be more intoxicating that those old oil paints that could send your head spinning.

 BLT Steak, LA Restaurant             BLT Steak, LA Restaurant - drinks

I recently took an “Easter Dishes” class at one of my favorite L.A. restaurants… BLT.  For the locals, it is in the old Le Dome building on Sunset Blvd.  In the class we actually got to learn about and experience mouth watering food in the kitchen of a legendary restaurant in LA. Chef Brian Moyers started with their famous popovers.  Now if you haven’t had a good popover…it is worthy of a trip to BLT, or at least trying to make your own at home.  These culinary wonders are a distant cousin to England’s pride and joy – Yorkshire Pudding.

Funny thing about popovers…they are visually challenged and full of hot air. I know many people like this, but I am not singing their praises. What qualities popovers lack, they make up for in depth & richness.  Just goes to show you that there are redeeming values in everyone.

BLT gives you the recipe for popovers if you eat at their establishment, but Chef Brian revealed the secrets to us and that is what I want to share with you….but you didn’t hear this from me!  I rushed out to Bed Bath & Beyond to buy my popover pan as I knew that I was about to be promoted from “fakes her way in the kitchen” to “food goddess” with this new recipe.

              

There are three secrets to great popovers;
a) pre-heat the pan
b) the temperature of the milk when you add it to the mix
b) straining the batter

Straining the batter?  What a strange concept to me, but I guess it gets those micro lumps out.  A chinois works best, but I used a regular metal strainer and it worked just fine.  I have to say…my popovers turned out every bit as good as Chef Brian’s…to his credit.  Thanks Brian!

            

Perfect Popovers

Yields 6 amazing popovers.
Double the recipe if you are lucky enough to have 2 popover pans.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole milk warmed – almost to a boil and pull it off 
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 cups flour (let the flour rest after measuring it)
  • 3/4 tablespoon salt
  • 1 cup grated Gruyere

Preparation

  1. Place the popover pan in the oven.  Heat the oven and pan to 350 degrees.
  2. Gently warm the milk over low heat until it almost boils and the pull it off and set aside.
  3. Whisk the eggs until frothy in your mixer and then slowly whisk in the milk (so as not to cook the eggs) Set the mixture aside.
  4. Sift the flour with the salt.  Slowly add this dry mixture to the egg mixture and gently combine until mostly smooth.
  5. Strain batter through a chinois or any metal strainer. Rest batter between 10-50 minutes.
  6. After resting period, remove popover pan from the oven and spray with non-stick vegetable spray.  While the batter is still slightly warm or room temperature (definitely not cool) fill each popover 3/4 full
  7. Sprinkle each popover with grated Gruyere.
  8. Bake at 350 degrees for 50 minutes, until golden brown, rotating pan half a turn after 25 minutes of baking.
  9. Remove from the oven & pan and serve immediately.

To reheat popovers put them in a hot oven for 5 minutes.

I hope you praise these perfect popovers as much as I do.
…and then she paused for thought 

Read full story · Comments { 1 }